Architecture You Love
A North Carolina 501C3 Educational Nonprofit Archive Documenting, Preserving, and Promoting Residential Modernist Architecture

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Enjoy browsing, but unless otherwise noted, these houses are private property and closed to the public -- so don't go tromping around uninvited.

JOHN BRUCE HAWKINS, AIA

Hawkins was born in Chapel Hill and grew up in a 100-year-old cottage on Hillsborough Street rented from bandleader Kay Kyser.  In 1957, the family moved to a Modernist split-level on Estes Drive designed by Jack Pruden.  In 1963-64, he spent a year in London where his dad was on sabbatical. The family of six toured extensively throughout Europe in a Volkswagen microbus. 

Hawkins graduated from Amherst with a BA in English Literature and Journalism in 1975; UVA as a special student in Architectural History in 1976; and the University of Minnesota with a BA in Architecture, in 1980.  From 1980 to 1989 he was project manager for Abrash Eddy & Eckhardt in Great Falls VA.  Returning to Chapel Hill, he worked 1989-1991 for O'Brien Atkins and 1991-1994 for CPAA.  He opened his own office in 1994 in downtown Chapel Hill which continues today. 

He wrote about design for Architecture Magazine (2000-2006); the Chapel Hill Newspaper (1995-2003); and NC Home Magazine (1990-1996).




1992 - The David and Elizabeth W. Hawkins House, 405 Deming, Chapel Hill, a house for Hawkins' parents. Sold in 2004 to David N. Taylor.  Sold in 2009 to William E. Boswell. 

1995 Article from Mid Atlantic Country magazine.


 

1997 - The Mark B. and Carol W. Rigsbee House, 417 Deming, Chapel Hill. 
As of 2012 still owned by the Rigsbees.


2000 - The David and Carol Hanson House, 112 Breckenridge, Chapel Hill. 


Sources include:  John Bruce Hawkins.